how much to tile a bathroom

How Much To Tile A Bathroom?

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Whether it’s a facelift or a full renovation of one of the busiest rooms in your home, tiling is a popular go-to decorating option for the bathroom, thanks to its easy maintenance and obvious choice for wet areas. But how much is it likely to set you back, and is it something you can do yourself?

First let’s look at what you need to consider, how much it really costs to tile a bathroom, and ultimately, what’s the best option for you.


Your Reasons for Tiling a Bathroom

clean and elegant bathroom

The first thing to think about is why you’re tiling your bathroom in the first place. Is it because your bathroom design needs to be brought into the 21st century or are the tiles cracked, having seen better days?

You also need to decide how much of your bathroom to renovate: Should you just replace the tiles around the shower and/or bath, or do you want the whole room befitted in floor-to-ceiling tiles? 

Pro Tip: Even if it’s a straightforward tile removal-and-replace, there may be additional wall prep involved.


Costs to Consider When Tiling a Bathroom

looking over tile selections

Before you dive in to choosing your desired tiles, it’s important to set a budget. You can do this by working out from this article whether it’s something you’re going to do yourself, or whether you’ll be hiring a professional to do the work for you. Once you’ve got an idea of how much it might cost, you can set a budget to refrain from spending more than necessary. 

Here are the cost factors that will determine whether it will be DIY, or an outsourced job and what sort of cost you need to budget for.

How Many Tiles Will You Need?

Firstly, determine whether you wish to tile the entire bathroom, just the walls, or only certain areas. The tiles themselves can cost from around £5 to £20 and more per square metre, depending on your choice of style. 

Once that decision is made, work out how many tiles you need by multiplying the height and width of the area you wish to be tiled and adding an extra 10% to allow for error and wastage. Full instructions are included in the video at the bottom of this guide.

Other Materials and Tools

In addition to your chosen tiles, you’ll also need tile adhesive, grout, silicone, and any tools that may be required such as a tile cutter, measuring tape and mixing bucket.

For a full list of tools, this article from Tile Mountain is a great resource. They also have an excellent calculator to help you determine how much grout and adhesive you’ll need. Add this and the price of your chosen tiles, plus whatever other tools you might need to buy/rent for the job, to get an idea of cost.

Additional Work Required

If you’re going to hire someone to do the job for you, bear in mind any work that will need doing prior to fitting the tiles. For example, will you expect them to remove any existing tiles first? If you’re looking to save on labour costs, you may consider doing that part yourself. Then, consider any wall prep that might be required, whether that be damage caused by removing the tiles, or underlying issues such as water ingress, as discussed in this article from the UK Bathroom Guru.

Labour Costs

A cost guide from Mybuilder.com suggests that, depending on experience of the tiler and your location, you can expect to pay between £20 and £40 per square meter. Some traders will charge a day rate, from around £150 – £200 per day.


Professional Cost Comparison Table

The comparison table below has been put together to give you an idea of how much you might expect to pay if you were to hire a professional to complete the tiling job for you, with you supplying just the tiles.

Prices have been sourced from Which? via a survey of bathroom fitters conducted in 2012. These prices include labour and materials, but do not include VAT.

JobDetailsPrice RangeAverage Cost Time
Small bathroom2.13m x 2.16m – customer to supply tiles£700 – £950£8251 – 3 days
Medium bathroom3.1m – customer to supply tiles£900 – £1,125£1,0122 – 4 days
Large bathroom4.06m – customer to supply tiles£1,200 – £1,800£1,5003 – 6 days

Tiling a Bathroom: Can You Do It Yourself?

Tiling is something that requires skill, patience and time. That’s not to say it can’t be done by an amateur, and if you are a keen DIYer, it’s likely you have at least two of the three attributes mentioned above.

According to m​​​​y job quote, it’s not too difficult to fit bathroom tiles yourself, but you’ll want to make sure you do the job properly to avoid any expensive problems further down the line, as mentioned in our article on How Much Does a Tiler Cost.

How to Fit Bathroom Tiles

Online and print magazine ‘Build It’ have a written, step-by-step guide on how to fit bathroom tiles. 

Alternatively, the video below from Wickes provides an easy-to-follow tutorial to help DIY enthusiasts:

If DIY isn’t your thing, or you simply don’t have the time and you’d prefer to hire someone, you can find a trusted tradesman via Rated People.


The Verdict: Should You Hire a Professional or DIY?

changing tiles in the bathroom

Ultimately, it depends on your budget, free time and your skill level. As briefly mentioned at the end of this article, the thought of water getting into the walls personally makes me nervous. If you’re confident in your ability and want to save money, it’s certainly something you could consider. On the other hand, if you’re like me and want the confidence of a professional fitting, here are some things to remember when obtaining quotations:

  • Ask for recommendations
  • Obtain at least three quotations
  • Get a breakdown of the quote, including any preparation required, materials and labour
  • Ask to see testimonials

Visit Rated People to find a quality tradesperson to help you get the end result you need. 

If you enjoyed this article and found it useful, please share it! Have you fitted your own bathroom tiles? How did it go? Please tell us your experience in the comments below to help our other readers.

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